Programming

K9

My Contribution in K9 Android Mail Client

My Contribution in K9 Android Mail Client

K-9 is an attractive, open-source email client for Android with support of IMAP, POP3, SMTP, and exchange protocols. Hence, this client does not support proxy feature. This problem is referenced in #704 #980 #2619. In this post I will talk about my contribution in K-9 project by adding SOCKs proxy feature, which can be used for connecting hidden mail services.

In previous post, I described about connecting Thunderbird, an open source email client for PC, to a hidden mail service. In this post I will talk about modifying K-9 mail and connecting Android client to the hidden mail service.

Continue reading Connecting to Hidden Mail Server using Android
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TorBird

In the previous post, I’ve talked about configuring a hidden email server using hMailServer. In this post I will talk about how to access this hidden Email server. I’m using ThunderBird as email client, tajbakhsh.fake as the fake domain of email server (and accounts), two users (saman@tajbakhsh.fake and test@tajbakhsh.fake).

During all the processes, I assume that the email server is configured as previous post and client has access to the TOR network.

Continue reading Connecting to Hidden Mail Server
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In this tutorial I want to write about using Apache Spark on Ubuntu machines where you can develop big data analysis apps with it.

First of all, I want to write a small and quick introduction to Hadoop + Spark environment. Hadoop makes it possible to work with lots of computers in a cluster. Work can be: storing files in cluster (HDFS – Hadoop Distributed File System), storing database in cluster (Apache HBase), or run software in cluster (MapReduce, Spark).

Continue reading Apache + Yarn + Spark: Play with Twitter data!

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2

Recently I’ve interested in byte code structure of Java and Dalvik. I’ve found some useful tools for playing with them.

Destination Byte Code

Java byte codes are simple to reverse engineering because they compile in run time. i.e. JVM will execute the byte codes in run time, thus Java code is cross platform but executes with more delay than direct compiled machine codes (for example using C++ and gcc).

Continue reading Reversing Java: Part I

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